probiotic

23 Future Perspectives

Future Perspectives in Probiotic Use

Lactobacilli derived from the endogenous flora of normal donors are being increasingly used as probiotics in functional foods and as vaccine carriers. However, a variety of studies carried out with distinct strains of lactobacilli have suggested heterogeneous and strain-specific effects (Table IV).

To dissect this heterogeneity at the immunological level, Ibnou-Zekri et al. (137) selected two strains of lactobacilli that displayed similar properties in vitro and studied their impact on mucosal and systemic B-cell responses in monoxenic mice. Germ-free mice were colonized with L. johnsonii (NCC 533) or L. paracasei (NCC 2461). Bacterial loads were monitored for 30 days in intestinal tissues, and mucosal and systemic B-cell responses were measured.

Although both Lactobacillus strains displayed similar growth, survival, and adherence properties in vitro, they colonized the intestinal lumen and translocated into mucosal lymphoid organs at different densities. L. johnsonii colonized the intestine very efficiently at high levels, whereas the number of L. paracasei decreased rapidly and it colonized at low levels. They determined whether this difference in colonization correlated with an induction of different types of immune responses, and observed that colonization with either strain induced similar germinal center formation and IgA bearing lymphocytes in the mucosa, suggesting that both strains may activate mucosal B-cell responses.

However, clear differences in the patterns of immunoglobulins were observed between the two strains in the mucosa and in the periphery. Therefore, despite similar in vitro probiotic properties, distinct Lactobacillus strains may colonize the gut differently and generate divergent immune responses.

In another study, Coakley et al. (138), assessed strains of Lactobacillus, Lactococcus, Pediococcus and Bifidobacterium for their ability to produce the health-promoting fatty acid conjugated linoleic acid from free linoleic acid. Strains of Lactobacillus, Lactococcus, Pediococcus and Bifidobacterium were grown in medium containing free linoleic acid. Growth of the bacteria in linoleic acid and conversion of the linoleic acid to conjugated linoleic acid was assessed.

Of the bacteria assessed, nine strains of Bifidobacterium produced the cg, t11 CLA isomer from free linoleic acid. The cg, t11 conjugated linoleic acid isomer was also produced by some strains, but at much lower concentrations. Thus, the production of conjugated linoleic acid by bifidobacteria showed considerable interspecies variation.

Bifidobacterium breve and B. dentium were the most efficient producers of conjugated linoleic acid among the range of strains tested, with B. breve converting up to 65% linoleic acid to cg, t11 conjugated linoleic acid when grown in 0.55 mg/ml linoleic acid. Strains also varied considerably with respect to their sensitivity to linoleic acid. The production of conjugated linoleic acid by probiotic bifidobacteria offers a possible mechanism for some health-enhancing properties of bifidobacteria and provides novel opportunities for the development of functional foods.

Finally, it has been demonstrated that the therapeutic dose of IL-10 may be reduced by localized delivery of a probiotic genetically engineered to secrete the cytokine. Intra-gastric administration of IL10-secreting Lactococcus lactis caused a 50% reduction in colitis in mice treated with dextran sulfate sodium and prevented the onset of colitis in IL-10 gene-deficient mice (139). This observation has also opened the way for the use of probiotics as live vaccine delivery vectors (140).

16 Treatment in vitro

Probiotic Treatment in vivo in Experimental Animals and in Man

There is some evidence suggesting that probiotics prevent infections caused by enteropathogens. About 47 different Lactobacillus strains have been tested in vitro for their ability to inhibit growth of a number of pathogens. Among the tested strains, L. rhamnosus 19070-2, L. reuteri DSM 12246, and L. rhamnosus LGG were identified most frequently in fecal samples; they were found in 10, eight, and seven of the 12 samples tested during the intervention period, respectively, whereas reisolations were less frequent in the washout period. Survival and reisolation of the bacteria in vivo appeared to be linked to pH tolerance, adhesion, and antimicrobial properties in vitro (94). The majority of the strains inhibited Yersinia entero colitica and Bacillus cereus and a few exhibited anti-microbial activities toward Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium (8).

Lactic acid bacteria in general may inhibit the growth of enteropathogens such as E. coli, H. pylori, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella spp. and others. This antagonistic activity is mediated either directly by the production of inhibitory substances such as lactic acid, hydrogen peroxide, bacteriocins, a-hydroxypropionaldehyde and other unidentified compounds or by competing with the pathogen for binding sites on the epitheliaL cell surface.

Another criterion for effective probiotic organisms is the adhesion to epithelial cells, a characteristic of several lactobacilli and some bifidobacteria. The factors mediating cell adhesion are still unknown. It has been suggested that proteinaceous factors are involved. Lipoteichoic acid participates in the adhesion of L. johnsonii La1 to epithelial Caco-2 cells (95).

A human feeding study conducted in 80 healthy volunteers showed that yogurt may be used as a vehicle for delivery of strain UCC118 to the human gastrointestinal tract with considerable efficacy in influencing gut flora and colonization. The investigators in Cork, Ireland, developed criteria for in vitro selection of probiotic bacteria that may reflect certain in vivo effects on the host, such as modulation of gastrointestinal tract microflora (18).

Probiotics_Upset_Stomachs

Probiotics for Upset Stomach

‘I stumbled on probiotics by shear chance’, says Ruben Stone. ‘After a severe stomach upset, my wife brought home these little drinks called ‘Good Belly’. I was surprised that they tasted quite good, a little tart, but tasty. The following day, my stomach was better. I couldn’t believe it. These probiotics must really be working’.Probiotics for Upset Stomach

According to both the Food and Agriculture and the World Health Organization, probiotics are “live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host.” Indeed, even the word “probiotics,” which means “for life” can make us highly optimistic about its potential benefits.

Given the upset stomachs that sometimes come with altitude sickness, these products may be a very helpful nutritional staple for us climbers.

Research shows that probiotics provide relief for the following illnesses:

  • Diarrhea
  • Yeast and urinary tract infections
  • Irritable bowel syndrome
  • Inflammation after colon surgery
  • Intestinal infections
  • Eczema in children
  • Bladder cancer

Probiotics use in Preventative Medicine

Probiotics are not only effective for treating serious illnesses, they also protect a healthy bowel. Some studies show that probiotics aid in digestion while protecting the body from harmful bacteria. Research is very impressive. There was a study in Sweden in 2006 that found that employees who were given the probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri missed less work due to respiratory or gastrointestinal illness than did employees who did not receive the probiotic.

Other studies suggest that probiotics can be used as preventative medicine for the following illnesses and conditions:

Colon Cancer: Some studies have found that probiotics may exert anti-carcinogenic effects by decreasing the activity of an enzyme called b-glucuronidase, which is ca[able of generating carcinogens in the digestive system

High Cholesterol: By breaking down bile in the gut, probiotics can inhibit its re-absorption. This is important, since bile re-enters the bloodstream as cholesterol

High Blood Pressure: Some studies show that milk fermented with probiotics can cause a modest reduction in blood pressure.

Infections: Taking probiotics may improve immune function, which will in turn help you fight infections. Research shows that probiotics may increase your proportion of T lymphocytes, which are also known as Natural Killer Cells. They are responsible for preventing respiratory tract infections and diarrhea.

Inflammation: Clinic trials suggest that probiotics can prevent inflammatory bowel diseases such as ulcerative colitis and crohn’s disease.

Lactose Intolerance: Some probiotics can help lactose intolerant people tolerate dairy products

Since taking antibiotics can kill off your “good” bacteria, many physicians are now suggesting that their patients supplement these drugs with some sort of probiotic.

Foods Rich in Probiotics

Cultured dairy products are an excellent source of probiotics. If you eat these products with such foods as spices, tea, red wine, berries, apples and beans, their effect is multiplied. Anyone who experiences chronic bloating and other digestive disorders may be interested in trying Dannon’s Activia. According to research, these disorders are caused by slow intestinal transit time. Dannon’s Activia contains a probiotic known as Bifidus Reularis, which helps regulate your digestive system by speeding up intestinal transit time.

If you are completely lactose intolerant, a company called Good Belly makes a non-dairy probiotic drink. It contains the probiotic known as Lp299v, which has been shown to be effective relief for people with irritable bowel syndrome.

Probiotics_study_Actimint

Probiotics in Actimint shows Positive Effect on Gut Flora

Probiotics, which means ‘for life’, have been used for centuries as natural components in health-promoting foods. Many experiments and studies have linked probiotics to aiding a range of ailments, such as lactose intolerance, colon cancer, lowering of cholesterol and blood pressure and, most importantly, improving immune function.

Actimint Probiotic mints

Courtesy of simplynatural.org.uk

A study just published by scientists at London’s Imperial College, published in Molecular Systems Biology, adds more weight to the argument for probiotic bacteria, demonstrating the measurable affect they have on gut flora. It revealed that when probiotics are consumed, the bile acids that break down fat in the gut are affected, possibly helping them to work more effectively. In theory, this could mean more fat passing undigested through the body – rather than being absorbed – although the study does not prove this.

Professor Jeremy Nicholson, who led the project, says: “Our study shows that probiotics can have an affect and they interact with local ecology and talk to other bacteria. We’re still trying to understand what the changes they bring about might mean, in terms of overall health, but we have established that introducing ‘friendly’ bacteria can change the dynamics of the whole population of microbes in the gut.

The gut naturally contains these beneficial bacteria which keep levels of disease-causing bacteria under control, but they are increasingly compromised by chemically-laden, over-processed foods, drink and medicines we ingest and the poilluted air we breathe. Supporting and boosting these good bacteria helps to restore optimum levels, aiding the immune system to detoxify the body and maintain a healthy digestive system, as well as providing a useful boost of sustained energy and even physical benefits. Anecdotal evidence ranges from improved eye sight to thicker, shinier hair.”

Probiotics are live microbes which provide fundamental health benefits. Lactobacillus acidophilus is one of the most important strains of bacterial culture and forms an important part of our digestive process. 150 billion microencapsulated live cells (colony forming units) per gram go into Actimint Tablets – all the benefits of a pot of yoghurt or a probiotic drink in just two easy-to-take, convenient to carry capsules.

Increasingly, research supports the health benefits of live bacteria (probiotics) to treat a variety of intestinal disorders and reduce staphylococcal growth during antibiotic treatment.

Professor Glenn Gibson, School of Biosciences at Reading University says: “Actimint is eminently suitable to take as a probiotic addition on a regular basis.”

He recommends taking probiotics before, during and after a course of antibiotics and says: “Nobody could overdose on it, because probiotics can only contribute to gut and oral health.”

Probiotics_Lactobacillus_info_research

Lactobacillus Acidophilus Probiotic Research

Lactobacillus Acidophillus Probiotics

Lactobacillus Acidophillus Probiotics Courtesy of lactic-acid-bacteria.net

Lactobacillus acidophilus, commonly called acidophilus, is one of several stains of friendly probiotic bacteria normally found in the intestines and vagina. These beneficial or friendly bacteria help protect the body from hostile organisms that can cause yeast infections, intestinal toxemia, and other health problems.

The name ‘lactobacillus acidophilus’ comes from lacto meaning milk, bacillus meaning rod-like in shape, and acidophilus meaning acid loving. This particular bacterium functions better in acidic environments than most other microorganisms.

The term probiotic breaks down as follows: “pro” means for and “biotic” means life. So a probiotic bacteria is for life or pro-life.

Intestinal flora, like acidophilus, play an important role in keeping the immune system healthy, the digestion system in balance, and in producing vitamins. Unfortunately, this army of friendly bacteria is under constant attack by a diverse group of enemies. Antibiotics, medications, chlorinated water, yeasts, chronic diarrhea, stress, infections, and poor diet can destroy these friendly bacteria. If the population of the probiotic bacteria is not replaced regularly with additional organisms, harmful bacteria can take over and cause serious health problems.

  • As acidophilus breaks down foods, it produces lactic acid, hydrogen peroxide, and other beneficial byproducts. This creates an environment where unfriendly organisms find it difficult to survive.
  • Also, acidophilus consumes many of the same nutrients these unfriendly organisms depend on, thus limiting their food source and ability to proliferate.
  • Acidophilus produces another important enzyme, lactase. Lactase breaks down milk sugar (lactose) into simple sugar. This is particularly beneficial for individuals that are lactose intolerant and can’t produce this enzyme.

Acidophilus also resides in the vagina.

  • It helps control the growth of yeast infections.
  • Common symptoms of yeast infections are burning, itching, inflammation, and discharge.
  • Some spermicides and contraceptive creams kill acidophilus and other beneficial bacteria.
  • This allows yeast infections to grow.
Health Benefits

Acidophilus typically residents in the small intestines of adults and older children and appears to provide these important benefits:

  1. Helps curtail yeast overgrowth,
  2. Improves digestion of dairy products,
  3. Prompts colon regularity,
  4. Neutralizes toxin growth,
  5. Helps maintain cholesterol levels,
  6. Helps with digestion of complex proteins and carbohydrates,
  7. Supports immune system functions.

Acidophilus supplement included in your daily diet appears to help keep your digestive system in balance and offset some of the negative effects caused by ingested toxins and viruses. If you currently are not taking a probiotic supplement on a regular basis, we strongly suggest you reconsider.

    • In a study reported in the February 1998 issue of Health & Nutrition Breakthroughs researchers tested the effect of using L. acidophilus and B. bifidum to destroy unfriendly micro-organisms. Twenty-eight adult subjects were divided into three groups.

      The first group received L. acidophilus.
      The second group received B. bifidum and
      The third group received a placebo.

      After three weeks, researchers took blood samples to determine the phagocytic activity (ability to destroy foreign bacteria) of each person’s white blood cells. They measured the cells’ ability to attack and ingest E. coli bacteria (known for its high potential to cause disease).

      • In subjects receiving either L. acidophilus or B. bifidum, the percentage of white blood cells able to destroy E. coli jumped from forty percent to eighty percent.
      • In the placebo group, there was no change in phagocytic activity.

      Blood samples were examined again six weeks after stopping probiotic supplementation and the phagocytic activity was still much greater than at the beginning of the study.

    • As early as the 1920’s, Dr R. Schroder conducted research to determine the importance of pH in the vagina and the role beneficial bacteria played in reducing vaginitis.

      In one study, Dr Schroder found that women suffering from a high incidence of vaginitis generally had high-alkaline pH and low levels of L. acidophilus present in the vagina. And, that women without vaginitis had acidic pH readings and L. acidophilus present.

  • Another study reported in a 1960 issue of American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology concluded that use of L. acidophilus capsules as vaginal inserts destroyed pathogenic germs such as staphylococcus, streptococcus, and diplococcus. It also caused the pH of the vagina to shift from alkaline to acidic. Vaginitis symptoms promptly disappeared and didn’t return as long as L. acidophilus supplementation continued.

Probiotics_IBS_Bifido_Infantis

Bifidobacteria Infantis Probiotic Use in Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)

Two new review articles cover therapeutic approaches to Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) in the July issue of Nutrition in Clinical Practice, and show growing evidence that probiotics, and specifically Bifidobacterium infantis35624 (B Infantis), are effective in helping manage IBS. Both articles point to data that suggest B. Infantis – has anti-inflammatory properties that help normalize gut function at a cellular level.

Bifidobacterium infantis

Bifidobacterium infantis -Courtesy of visualphotos.com

In “Behavioral and Complementary Approaches for the Treatment of IBS,” the authors acknowledge that there is “increasing evidence of efficacy” for probiotics. The first study evaluated patients randomly receiving Lactobacillus salivarius, B. infantis or placebo, and after eight weeks found that the patients receiving B. infantis had the greatest reduction in IBS symptoms. The study also found that these patients experienced a reduction of inflammatory cytokines compared with those taking placebo.

The second review article, “Update on Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Gender Differences”, which cites the same study by O’Mahony et al., notes that the “strain and type of probiotic used may be responsible for the degree and type of improvement. Patients receiving B. Infantis experienced a reduction of IBS symptoms ranging from constipation, diarrhea and bloating for up to four weeks. .

“We think that imbalances in gut microflora lead to a chronic, low-level inflammation in the intestines and the presence of these inflammatory biomarkers in the bloodstream. The overall impact of these circulating biomarkers is unclear, but it’s been suggested that they could negatively impact healthy tissues,” said O’Mahony. “The B. Infantis results not only have great implications for the treatment of digestive conditions, but offer researchers a potentially new path of exploration around inflammation-based diseases like arthritis.”

About IBS

IBS is a gastrointestinal disorder that is characterized by a group of symptoms including constipation, diarrhea, urgency, abdominal discomfort, gas and bloating. A painful and embarrassing condition, IBS affects about 10 – 20 percent of the American population and is most common among women. The cause of IBS is unclear, but can include medication (antibiotics), stress, and dairy.

Probiotics_Good_Bacteria

When Bacteria Is Good for You

Report by Gailon Totheroh of CBN News, March 1, 2008

‘Bifido’ and ‘Acidophilus’? What are they?

Haven’t heard of bifido? How about sweet acidophilus? Doug Kaufmann, nutritionist, says these are healthy bugs. For 30 years he’s been informing the public about good bacteria. And research says these probiotics can help fight opportunistic infections like MRSA, E. Coli, certain intestinal afflictions and others.When Bacteria Is Good for You

“H. pylori, which is a bacterium in the stomach that can link to peptic ulcers and various other health conditions … these are all bacterial infections that are acquired that can be treated with broad spectrum probiotics,” said William Schoor, head of a probiotics company. Schoor got into the business after good bacteria saved his dad from the ravages of Irritable Bowel Syndrome. “A number of months ago there was an article where they were telling mainstream doctors it could be better to wash their hands in gallons of yogurt daily as to use antibiotic soap,” he said.

Why?
Some blame antibiotic soaps for fostering superbugs and deadly infections in hospitals. Normally we all start life with probiotics. Babies pick up healthy microbes – also called lactic acid bacteria, from their mothers. “Children who are breast fed, they are much healthier with a stronger immune system because of the lactic acid bacteria that they get,” Schoor said.

Our Germ Fixation

But our obsession with germs can cause obstacles to having enough good bacteria. Chlorine and fluoride in tapwater diminish them. Antibiotics do destroy them.

“Anyone, in my humble opinion, who has taken an antibiotic needs to follow up with a probiotic. This is a grey area of science right now; doctors writing antibiotic prescriptions like they’re going out of style, without recommending the follow-up,” says Kaufman. “Junk food, sodas, and sugar feed the bad bacteria. Too much bad bacteria encourages fungal overgrowth in the body, those yeast infections, leaving the good bacteria absent. And when the bacteria goes away, the yeast can literally poke a tiny hole in the intestine. The first thing some of these sick people see is food allergy,” Kaufmann continues.

“That comes from bits of food that leak into the blood stream. The body starts to see these particles, ranging from milk to wheat, as an enemy instead of a nutrient. The recent increase in childhood asthma, connected with allergies, may be one of the consequences. So adequate probiotics may not only squelch allergies, but promote better immunity and nutrition.

Trust Your Gut

Schoor says, “Your gut is your first line of defense. All the water that you drink that is utilized and absorbed takes place in the colon – all nutrients are absorbed in your small intestine. The Royal Academy of Medicine in Great Britain said that 85% of all degenerative disease and illness is due to an imbalance of the microecology in your GI tract.”

So for the sake of our “micro-ecology” should we all start bathing in yogurt?

“It was never put on the market to be a medicine. It was put on the market as a food. And you will find some good yogurts. I would always get plain yogurt and then add fresh berries, nuts, etc into the yogurt,” Kaufmann said. “But to get that medicinal dose of the right bacterial varieties, supplements are required. One of several good brands is the one Schoor distributes — Dr. Ohhira’s Japanese variety.

There are specialized probiotics for children as well. Some autistic children have even improved from good bacteria. Schoor says to find a probiotic that works for your system – especially if you’ve had serious health problems. But here’s what you can expect:

“Usually within the first 12 to 24 hours of initially taking it you should experience something known as the Herxheimer’s reaction or the healing crisis. And this will feel like a negative or a side effect,” he said. Those effects can include bloating, stomach distress, and diarrhea. But that’s actually a positive, an indication that the good bacteria are flushing out bad bacteria, harmful fungus, and lingering waste matter.

How Much Should We Take?

How often to take friendly bacteria? For healthy people, once in a while may be enough. For those with compromised immune systems, it may be a constant requirement. “If they’re getting the intended results they want, then it’s not something that you have to take daily. You could take it frequently, once or twice a week. Or every other day depending on your body’s response – what your body is telling you,” Schoor said.

What your mind may be telling you is correct: Plenty of good bacteria in the gut means more nutrients from good food are available. So should the new medicine be good bacteria? Well, it’s not so new. A century ago scientist Ilya Mechnikov found that peasants who ate sour milk with friendly bacteria lived longer than anybody in Europe.

Kaufmann says, “Having worked with so many people with so many different various forms, species of bacteria, what I’ve discovered is something in the future we will begin to look at like we do vitamins today.”

Reference:
Source: CBNNews.com, March 1, 2008

Probiotic_Lactobacillus_Acidophilus_info

Lactobacillus Acidophilus Probiotic

Lactobacillus acidophilus, commonly called acidophilus, is one of several stains of friendly probiotic bacteria normally found in the intestines and vagina. These beneficial bacteria help protect the body from hostile organisms that can cause yeast infections, intestinal toxemia, and other health problems.

The name ‘lactobacillus acidophilus’ comes from lacto meaning milk, bacillus meaning rod-like in shape, and acidophilus meaning acid loving. This particular bacterium functions better in acidic environments than most other microorganisms.

The term probiotic breaks down as follows: “pro” means for and “biotic” means life. So a probiotic bacteria is for life or pro-life.

Intestinal flora, like acidophilus, play an important role in keeping the immune system healthy, the digestion system in balance, and in producing vitamins. Unfortunately, this army of friendly bacteria is under constant attack by a diverse group of enemies. Antibiotics, medications, chlorinated water, yeasts, chronic diarrhea, stress, infections, and poor diet can destroy these friendly bacteria. If the population of the probiotic bacteria is not replaced regularly with additional organisms, harmful bacteria can take over and cause serious health problems.

  • As acidophilus breaks down foods, it produces lactic acid, hydrogen peroxide, and other beneficial byproducts. This creates an environment where unfriendly organisms find it difficult to survive.
  • Also, acidophilus consumes many of the same nutrients these unfriendly organisms depend on, thus limiting their food source and ability to proliferate.
  • Acidophilus produces another important enzyme, lactase. Lactase breaks down milk sugar (lactose) into simple sugar. This is particularly beneficial for individuals that are lactose intolerant and can’t produce this enzyme.

Acidophilus also resides in the vagina.

  • It helps control the growth of yeast infections.
  • Common symptoms of yeast infections are burning, itching, inflammation, and discharge.
  • Some spermicides and contraceptive creams kill acidophilus and other beneficial bacteria.
  • This allows yeast infections to grow.

Health Benefits

Acidophilus typically residents in the small intestines of adults and older children and appears to provide these important benefits:

  1. Helps curtail yeast overgrowth,
  2. Improves digestion of dairy products,
  3. Prompts colon regularity,
  4. Neutralizes toxin growth,
  5. Helps maintain cholesterol levels,
  6. Helps with digestion of complex proteins and carbohydrates,
  7. Supports immune system functions.

Acidophilus supplement included in your daily diet appears to help keep your digestive system in balance and offset some of the negative effects caused by ingested toxins and viruses. If you currently are not taking a probiotic supplement on a regular basis, we strongly suggest you reconsider.

    • In a study reported in the February 1998 issue of Health & Nutrition Breakthroughs researchers tested the effect of using L. acidophilus and B. bifidum to destroy unfriendly micro-organisms. Twenty-eight adult subjects were divided into three groups.

      The first group received L. acidophilus.
      The second group received B. bifidum and
      the third group received a placebo.
      After three weeks, researchers took blood samples to determine the phagocytic activity (ability to destroy foreign bacteria) of each person’s white blood cells. They measured the cells’ ability to attack and ingest E. coli bacteria (known for its high potential to cause disease).

      • In subjects receiving either L. acidophilus or B. bifidum, the percentage of white blood cells able to destroy E. coli jumped from forty percent to eighty percent.
      • In the placebo group, there was no change in phagocytic activity.

      Blood samples were examined again six weeks after stopping probiotic supplementation and the phagocytic activity was still much greater than at the beginning of the study.

  • As early as the 1920’s, Dr R. Schroder conducted research to determine the importance of pH in the vagina and the role beneficial bacteria played in reducing vaginitis.

    In one study, Dr Schroder found that women suffering from a high incidence of vaginitis generally had high-alkaline pH and low levels of L. acidophilus present in the vagina. And, that women without vaginitis had acidic pH readings and L. acidophilus present.

  • Another study reported in a 1960 issue of American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology concluded that use of L. acidophilus capsules as vaginal inserts destroyed pathogenic germs such as staphylococcus, streptococcus, and diplococcus. It also caused the pH of the vagina to shift from alkaline to acidic. Vaginitis symptoms promptly disappeared and didn’t return as long as L. acidophilus supplementation continued.