Lactobacillus Acidophilus

Probiotics_Lactobacillus_info_research

Lactobacillus Acidophilus Probiotic Research

Lactobacillus Acidophillus Probiotics

Lactobacillus Acidophillus Probiotics Courtesy of lactic-acid-bacteria.net

Lactobacillus acidophilus, commonly called acidophilus, is one of several stains of friendly probiotic bacteria normally found in the intestines and vagina. These beneficial or friendly bacteria help protect the body from hostile organisms that can cause yeast infections, intestinal toxemia, and other health problems.

The name ‘lactobacillus acidophilus’ comes from lacto meaning milk, bacillus meaning rod-like in shape, and acidophilus meaning acid loving. This particular bacterium functions better in acidic environments than most other microorganisms.

The term probiotic breaks down as follows: “pro” means for and “biotic” means life. So a probiotic bacteria is for life or pro-life.

Intestinal flora, like acidophilus, play an important role in keeping the immune system healthy, the digestion system in balance, and in producing vitamins. Unfortunately, this army of friendly bacteria is under constant attack by a diverse group of enemies. Antibiotics, medications, chlorinated water, yeasts, chronic diarrhea, stress, infections, and poor diet can destroy these friendly bacteria. If the population of the probiotic bacteria is not replaced regularly with additional organisms, harmful bacteria can take over and cause serious health problems.

  • As acidophilus breaks down foods, it produces lactic acid, hydrogen peroxide, and other beneficial byproducts. This creates an environment where unfriendly organisms find it difficult to survive.
  • Also, acidophilus consumes many of the same nutrients these unfriendly organisms depend on, thus limiting their food source and ability to proliferate.
  • Acidophilus produces another important enzyme, lactase. Lactase breaks down milk sugar (lactose) into simple sugar. This is particularly beneficial for individuals that are lactose intolerant and can’t produce this enzyme.

Acidophilus also resides in the vagina.

  • It helps control the growth of yeast infections.
  • Common symptoms of yeast infections are burning, itching, inflammation, and discharge.
  • Some spermicides and contraceptive creams kill acidophilus and other beneficial bacteria.
  • This allows yeast infections to grow.
Health Benefits

Acidophilus typically residents in the small intestines of adults and older children and appears to provide these important benefits:

  1. Helps curtail yeast overgrowth,
  2. Improves digestion of dairy products,
  3. Prompts colon regularity,
  4. Neutralizes toxin growth,
  5. Helps maintain cholesterol levels,
  6. Helps with digestion of complex proteins and carbohydrates,
  7. Supports immune system functions.

Acidophilus supplement included in your daily diet appears to help keep your digestive system in balance and offset some of the negative effects caused by ingested toxins and viruses. If you currently are not taking a probiotic supplement on a regular basis, we strongly suggest you reconsider.

    • In a study reported in the February 1998 issue of Health & Nutrition Breakthroughs researchers tested the effect of using L. acidophilus and B. bifidum to destroy unfriendly micro-organisms. Twenty-eight adult subjects were divided into three groups.

      The first group received L. acidophilus.
      The second group received B. bifidum and
      The third group received a placebo.

      After three weeks, researchers took blood samples to determine the phagocytic activity (ability to destroy foreign bacteria) of each person’s white blood cells. They measured the cells’ ability to attack and ingest E. coli bacteria (known for its high potential to cause disease).

      • In subjects receiving either L. acidophilus or B. bifidum, the percentage of white blood cells able to destroy E. coli jumped from forty percent to eighty percent.
      • In the placebo group, there was no change in phagocytic activity.

      Blood samples were examined again six weeks after stopping probiotic supplementation and the phagocytic activity was still much greater than at the beginning of the study.

    • As early as the 1920’s, Dr R. Schroder conducted research to determine the importance of pH in the vagina and the role beneficial bacteria played in reducing vaginitis.

      In one study, Dr Schroder found that women suffering from a high incidence of vaginitis generally had high-alkaline pH and low levels of L. acidophilus present in the vagina. And, that women without vaginitis had acidic pH readings and L. acidophilus present.

  • Another study reported in a 1960 issue of American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology concluded that use of L. acidophilus capsules as vaginal inserts destroyed pathogenic germs such as staphylococcus, streptococcus, and diplococcus. It also caused the pH of the vagina to shift from alkaline to acidic. Vaginitis symptoms promptly disappeared and didn’t return as long as L. acidophilus supplementation continued.

Probiotics_Lactobacillus_acidophilus

Lactobacillus Acidophilus Probiotics: A human friendly bacteria

Lactobacillus Acidophilus is the most commonly used probiotic, or “friendly” bacteria. Such healthy bacteria inhabit the intestines and vagina and protect against the entrance and proliferation of “bad” organisms that can cause disease.

 

Lactobacillus-Acidophillus

This is accomplished through a variety of mechanisms. For example, the breakdown of food by L. acidophilus leads to production of lactic acid, hydrogen peroxide, and other byproducts that make the environment hostile for undesired organisms. L. acidophilus also produces lactase, the enzyme that breaks down milk sugar (lactose) into simple sugars. People who are lactose intolerant do not produce this enzyme. For this reason, L. acidophilus supplements may be beneficial for these individuals.

Other potential probiotics include a variety of Lactobacillus species (spp) such as the casei GG , rhamnosus , NCFM, DDS-1, and johnsonii strains, Bifidobacterium longum , Bifidobacterium bifidum, Streptococcus thermophilus, Enterococcus faecium, Saccharaomyces boulardii, Bacillus spp., and Escherichia coli .

Probiotics offer many potentially therapeutic uses. These include the following:

  • Replacing the “friendly” intestinal bacteria destroyed by antibiotics.
  • Aiding digestion and suppressing disease-causing bacteria.
  • Preventing and treating diarrhea, including infectious diarrhea, particularly from rotavirus (a virus that commonly causes diarrhea in children).
  • Treating overgrowth of pathogenic or “bad” organisms in the gastrointestinal tract (a condition that tends to cause diarrhea and may occur from use of antibiotics.
  • Alleviating symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and, possibly, inflammatory bowel disease IBD (such as Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis).
  • Preventing and/or reducing the recurrence of vaginal yeast infections, urinary tract infections, and cystitis (bladder inflammation). The best scientific evidence exists for vaginal infections.
  • Improving lactose absorption digestion in people who are lactose intolerant
  • Enhancing the immune response. Studies have suggested that consumption of yogurt or milk that contains specific strains of Lactobacillus or supplements with Lactobacillus or Bifidobacterium may improve the natural immune response. Further research is needed to confirm these early findings and to best understand how the improved immune function may or may not help in warding off infections.
  • Aiding the treatment of respiratory infections such as sinusitis, bronchitis, and pneumonia. More research is needed in this area.
  • Lowering risk of allergies. Examples include asthma, hay fever, food allergies to milk, and skin reactions such as eczema.
  • Helping to treat high cholesterol.
  • Reducing the risk of recurring bladder tumors once this cancer has been treated.
  • Other conditions under investigation for use of probiotics include colon cancer, HIV related diarrhea, and Helicobacter pylori, an organism that can lead to development of ulcers.

 

The primary dietary sources of L. acidophilus include milk enriched with acidophilus, yogurt containing live L. acidophilus cultures, miso, and tempeh.

Prebiotics are found in breast milk, onions, tomatoes, bananas, honey, barley, garlic and wheat. L. acidophilus preparations consist of dried or liquid cultures of living bacteria. These cultures are usually grown in milk but can sometimes be grown in milk-free cultures. L. acidophilus is available in the following forms:

  • Freeze-dried granules
  • Freeze-dried powders
  • Freeze-dried capsules
  • Liquid L. acidophilus preparations (which must be kept refrigerated)

Prebiotics occur naturally in foods, but supplements provide a more concentrated source of this substance. Prebiotics are oligosacchrides, chains of sugar units linked together. Inulin is a long-chain oligosacchride (from 2-60 sugars) and fructooligosaccharides (FOS) are short-chain oligosaccharides (from 2-7 sugars).

Newborns and Infants (0 to 1 year)

  • Liquid preparations may be used as a lotion and applied topically to diaper area for yeast infections and diaper rashes.
  • If the child is on antibiotic therapy, ¼ tsp or ¼ capsule can be taken orally 2 hours after each dose of antibiotics to replace beneficial bacteria.
  • Add ¼ tsp or ¼ capsule to water for the treatment of oral infections.

 

Recommended doses of L. acidophilus vary depending on the health condition being treated.

  • Vaginal infections: 8 ounces of yogurt (with live active cultures containing one of the Lactobacillus or Bifidobacterium strains listed above) daily or an oral daily supplement containing at least 1 to 2 billion live organisms. Clinical experience also suggests that placing yogurt with live acidophilus cultures directly to the vaginal area, using a disposable spatula and wearing a sanitary pad, helps to relieve itching and inflammation. Similarly, lactobacillus capsules or tablets may be inserted directly into the vagina.
  • Cystitis: 1 to 2 capsules or tablets inserted into the vagina nightly for two weeks
  • Maintaining normal intestinal flora: 1 to 10 billion viable cells per day

Mild gastrointestinal upset may occur in some individuals (not on antibiotic therapy) who take more than 1 to 2 billion L. acidophilus cells per day.

Easir Abedin
Assistant Manager, Quality Control at NOVO Healthcare and Pharma Ltd.
The New Nation
Bangladesh’s Independent News Source
November 16th, 2008

Probiotic_Lactobacillus_Acidophilus_info

Lactobacillus Acidophilus Probiotic

Lactobacillus acidophilus, commonly called acidophilus, is one of several stains of friendly probiotic bacteria normally found in the intestines and vagina. These beneficial bacteria help protect the body from hostile organisms that can cause yeast infections, intestinal toxemia, and other health problems.

The name ‘lactobacillus acidophilus’ comes from lacto meaning milk, bacillus meaning rod-like in shape, and acidophilus meaning acid loving. This particular bacterium functions better in acidic environments than most other microorganisms.

The term probiotic breaks down as follows: “pro” means for and “biotic” means life. So a probiotic bacteria is for life or pro-life.

Intestinal flora, like acidophilus, play an important role in keeping the immune system healthy, the digestion system in balance, and in producing vitamins. Unfortunately, this army of friendly bacteria is under constant attack by a diverse group of enemies. Antibiotics, medications, chlorinated water, yeasts, chronic diarrhea, stress, infections, and poor diet can destroy these friendly bacteria. If the population of the probiotic bacteria is not replaced regularly with additional organisms, harmful bacteria can take over and cause serious health problems.

  • As acidophilus breaks down foods, it produces lactic acid, hydrogen peroxide, and other beneficial byproducts. This creates an environment where unfriendly organisms find it difficult to survive.
  • Also, acidophilus consumes many of the same nutrients these unfriendly organisms depend on, thus limiting their food source and ability to proliferate.
  • Acidophilus produces another important enzyme, lactase. Lactase breaks down milk sugar (lactose) into simple sugar. This is particularly beneficial for individuals that are lactose intolerant and can’t produce this enzyme.

Acidophilus also resides in the vagina.

  • It helps control the growth of yeast infections.
  • Common symptoms of yeast infections are burning, itching, inflammation, and discharge.
  • Some spermicides and contraceptive creams kill acidophilus and other beneficial bacteria.
  • This allows yeast infections to grow.

Health Benefits

Acidophilus typically residents in the small intestines of adults and older children and appears to provide these important benefits:

  1. Helps curtail yeast overgrowth,
  2. Improves digestion of dairy products,
  3. Prompts colon regularity,
  4. Neutralizes toxin growth,
  5. Helps maintain cholesterol levels,
  6. Helps with digestion of complex proteins and carbohydrates,
  7. Supports immune system functions.

Acidophilus supplement included in your daily diet appears to help keep your digestive system in balance and offset some of the negative effects caused by ingested toxins and viruses. If you currently are not taking a probiotic supplement on a regular basis, we strongly suggest you reconsider.

    • In a study reported in the February 1998 issue of Health & Nutrition Breakthroughs researchers tested the effect of using L. acidophilus and B. bifidum to destroy unfriendly micro-organisms. Twenty-eight adult subjects were divided into three groups.

      The first group received L. acidophilus.
      The second group received B. bifidum and
      the third group received a placebo.
      After three weeks, researchers took blood samples to determine the phagocytic activity (ability to destroy foreign bacteria) of each person’s white blood cells. They measured the cells’ ability to attack and ingest E. coli bacteria (known for its high potential to cause disease).

      • In subjects receiving either L. acidophilus or B. bifidum, the percentage of white blood cells able to destroy E. coli jumped from forty percent to eighty percent.
      • In the placebo group, there was no change in phagocytic activity.

      Blood samples were examined again six weeks after stopping probiotic supplementation and the phagocytic activity was still much greater than at the beginning of the study.

  • As early as the 1920’s, Dr R. Schroder conducted research to determine the importance of pH in the vagina and the role beneficial bacteria played in reducing vaginitis.

    In one study, Dr Schroder found that women suffering from a high incidence of vaginitis generally had high-alkaline pH and low levels of L. acidophilus present in the vagina. And, that women without vaginitis had acidic pH readings and L. acidophilus present.

  • Another study reported in a 1960 issue of American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology concluded that use of L. acidophilus capsules as vaginal inserts destroyed pathogenic germs such as staphylococcus, streptococcus, and diplococcus. It also caused the pH of the vagina to shift from alkaline to acidic. Vaginitis symptoms promptly disappeared and didn’t return as long as L. acidophilus supplementation continued.